Category Archives: Bill of Rights

It Is Necessary for Every American to Stop the Dissemination of Principles Evidently Destructive of the Cause for Which They Have Bled…

Mercy Otis Warren

Mercy Otis Warren

“It is necessary for every American, with becoming energy to endeavor to stop the dissemination of principles evidently destructive of the cause for which they have bled. It must be the combined virtue of the rulers and of the people to do this, and to rescue and save their civil and religious rights from the outstretched arm of tyranny, which may appear under any mode or form of government.” — Mercy Warren, History of the Rise, Progress, and Termination of the American Revolution, 1805

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Filed under American Revolution, Bill of Rights, Courage

God Who Gave Us Life Gave Us Liberty

Thomas Jefferson

Thomas Jefferson

“God who gave us life gave us Liberty. Can the liberties of a nation be secure when we have removed a conviction that these liberties are the gift of God?” — Thomas Jefferson, 1774

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Filed under American Exceptionalism, Bill of Rights, Enumerated Powers & Delegated Authority, Fear & Reverence of God, Founding Fathers, Freedom/Liberty, God & Nation, Human Rights/Natural Rights, Independence, Limited Government, Thomas Jefferson

Liberties are the Gift of God

Thomas Jefferson

Thomas Jefferson

“And can the liberties of a nation be thought secure when we have removed their only firm basis, a conviction in the minds of the people that these liberties are the gift of God? That they are not to be violated but with his wrath? Indeed I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just: that his justice cannot sleep forever.” — Thomas Jefferson, Notes on the State of Virginia, Query 18, 1781

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Filed under Bill of Rights, Enumerated Powers & Delegated Authority, Fear & Reverence of God, Founding Fathers, Freedom/Liberty, God & Government, Human Rights/Natural Rights, Independence, Individual Responsibility, Limited Government, Thomas Jefferson, Tyranny

No Majority has a Right to Deprive the Individual of Unalienable Rights

Albert Gallatin

Albert Gallatin

“The whole of that Bill [of Rights] is a declaration of the right of the people at large or considered as individuals… [I]t establishes some rights of the individual as unalienable and which consequently, no majority has a right to deprive them of.” — Albert Gallatin, Letter to Alexander Addison — 1789

Abraham Alfonse Albert Gallatin (January 29, 1761 – August 12, 1849) was a Swiss-American ethnologist, linguist, politician, diplomat, congressman, and the longest-serving United States Secretary of the Treasury. In 1831, he founded the University of the City of New York, now New York University.

Born in Geneva in present-day Switzerland, Gallatin immigrated to America in the 1780s, ultimately settling in Pennsylvania. He was politically active against the Federalist Party program, and was elected to the United States Senate in 1793. However, he was removed from office by a 14–12 party-line vote after a protest raised by his opponents suggested he did not meet the required nine years of citizenship. Two years later, he was elected to the House of Representatives and served in the fourth through sixth Congresses, becoming House Majority Leader. He was an important member of the new Democratic-Republican Party, its chief spokesman on financial matters, and led opposition to many of the policy proposals of Treasury SecretaryAlexander Hamilton. He also helped found the House Committee on Finance (later the Ways and Means Committee) and often engineered withholding of finances by the House as a method of overriding executive actions to which he objected. While Treasury Secretary, his services to his country were honored in 1805 when Meriwether Lewis named one of the three headwaters of the Missouri River after Gallatin.

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Filed under Albert Gallatin, American Exceptionalism, Bill of Rights, Democratic Republic, Founding Fathers, Freedom/Liberty, Human Rights/Natural Rights

The Power Who is Jealous of Our Prosperity…

Thomas Paine

Thomas Paine

“Is the power who is jealous of our prosperity, a proper power to govern us? Whoever says No, to this question, is an Independant for independency means no more than this, whether we shall make our own laws, or, whether the King, the greatest enemy this continent hath, or can have, shall tell us there shall be no laws but such as I like.” — Thomas Paine, Common Sense, 1776

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Filed under Abuse & Misuse of Power, Bill of Rights, Checks & Balances in Government, Democratic Republic, Enumerated Powers & Delegated Authority, Founding Fathers, Freedom/Liberty, Human Rights/Natural Rights, Individual Responsibility, Limited Government, Statism, Thomas Paine, Tyranny

Property is as Sacred as the Laws of God

John Adams

John Adams

“The moment the idea is admitted into society that property is not as sacred as the laws of God, and that there is not a force of law and public justice to protect it, anarchy and tyranny commence.” — John Adams

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Filed under Abuse & Misuse of Power, Bill of Rights, Founding Fathers, Human Rights/Natural Rights, John Adams, Limited Government, Rule of Law, Tyranny

Taking Up Arms to Preserve Their Property as Individuals and Their Rights as Freemen…

Josiah Quincy, Jr

Josiah Quincy, Jr

“No free government was ever founded or ever preserved its liberty, without uniting the characters of the citizen and soldier in those destined for the defense of the state…. Such are a well regulated militia, composed of the freeholders, citizen and husbandman, who take up arms to preserve their property, as individuals, and their rights as freemen.” — Josiah Quincy, Jr., Thoughts on Standing Armies, 1774.

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Filed under Bill of Rights, Federalism, Founding Fathers, Individual Responsibility, Limited Government, Second Amendment